Oil-Specific Cosmetics and Uses

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Oil-Specific Cosmetics and Uses

Essential oils are a staple. They are the tell-tale sign of a quality cosmetics product, and they provide a natural basis for any formula. You can count on them to be suited for a large percentage of the population, and to get the job done. Using essential oils in your private label ensures that consumers will want to return to your brand. Obviously, you can’t just infuse an inferior product with a bunch of random oils, slap a new label on it, and expect it to be amazing. You need to be in possession of a high-grade formula, which makes use of essential oils and properly harnesses their many healing attributes.

The following oils are tried, true, and proven. They can help boost the effectiveness of a product, providing the formula is a quality one.

Argan Oil

Argan Oil

Hailing from Morocco and Northern Algir, this oil is used as a food, a healer, and a cosmetics agent. It can be mixed with many other essential oils, and is highly beneficial for various skin conditions and infections. The argan tree’s oil has even been linked to improving blood circulation, lowering bad cholesterol, and preventing cardiovascular diseases. Nothing clinically proven yet, I believe, as more studies are needed.

Make sure that the argan oil you use is pure, undiluted, and not meant for culinary use. Remember that the oil’s place of origin doesn’t necessarily attest to its quality, nor does it guarantee it to be authentic or free of additives.

Sage Oil

Sage Oil

Sage is one of the most commonly used herbs in existence. Its essential oil is powerful and effective, and it is used in many cosmetics formulas. Sage oil is closely associated with hair care products, such as shampoos and conditioners. However, it can also be used as an effective anti-aging element and skin toner.

There are many different types of sage, and they are used for a variety of medicinal and culinary purposes. The most popular kinds of sage in the cosmetics industry are clary sage, three-lobed sage, pineapple sage, and azure sage.

Rosemary Oil

Rosemary Oil

One does not simply ignore rosemary’s fragrance and presence. It is a plant which is native to the Mediterranean, and its oil is derived from its flowers and leaves. It can be used as a food additive and medicinal plant, and its use in aromatherapy is well-documented. Rosemary contains antioxidants, iron, calcium, B6, and other positive elements. It is used as an antifungal, antibacterial, and anti-inflammatory agent. There are many varieties of rosemary, but the essential oil is derived from rosmarinus officinalis. Within that single variety are three sub-types:
Rosemary Camphor, Rosemary Verbenone, and Rosemary Eucalyptol. Verbenone is used in many high-quality products, because of its refreshing and invigorating properties, but all three are fine additions. The right one depends on the product and formula in question.

Lavender Oil

Lavender Oil

Another very popular oil, and one which has so many uses and benefits. Lavender has a hand in everything: hair care, skin care, sleep care (I use it daily before bed), and even food! Lavender has a truly intoxicating scent, and it is no wonder that it was used by the great ancient empires of Egypt, Greece, and Rome. Its healing properties are known far and wide, and the herb itself is a native to the Mediterranean region.

There are many types of lavender oil, derived from different species of the plant. There is an ongoing argument over which variety produces the finest oil. The jury is still out on that one, but among the best choices for cosmetic use are: Bulgarian lavender, French lavender, and Grosso Lavender.

Evening Primrose Oil

Evening Primrose Oil

Evening Primrose oil is a great skin moisturizer. It can really help hydrate dry patches of skin, and is also used to improve conditions such as eczema and psoriasis. If you are looking for an oil which can ease local inflammation, and provide quick itch-relief, while helping your skin achieve a healthier look and feel – Evening Primrose may definitely be your man. EP has been associated with line and wrinkle reduction, and it can do wonders for those sorry-looking dark under-eye bags.

h2>Avocado Oil

Avocado Oil

Okay, step back. We’re dealing with avocado here. A personal favorite of mine, whether in its original form or as an essential oil. The fruit itself is absolutely amazing. I just love it with some sea salt and lemon, spread on freshly-baked bread. Well, now I am hungry. At any rate, its essential oil is used as an anti-aging ingredient, as a deep skin moisturizer, and even as a massage oil (due to its high penetration and absorption factor). Avocado oil can easily be mixed in with other types of essential oils, and it can provide the finishing touch on any hair or skin care product.

Tea Tree Oil

Tea Tree Oil

How on earth did I get this far down the list, without mentioning tea tree oil?! What a travesty! Let’s remedy that, shall we?

The tea tree, aka melaleuca alternifolia, became increasingly popular at the turn of the 20th century, when rumors of its oil’s amazing healing powers traveled from its native Australia to the rest of the world. The Aussie Aborigines already knew of its properties for many generations, and soon enough the Western world fell in love with it as well. These days, it is used in many cosmetics products, and it is even used in various bug repellents and cleaning solutions. It has highly potent antifungal, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antiseptic abilities. It seems almost too much to ask from one essential oil, but it works, and how!

Mint Oil

Peppermint Oil

There are approximately 17 different types of mint in the world. That number is still being debated, but what is not being debated is the mint plant’s effectiveness and benefits. It is used in so many fields: medicine of all kinds, from indigestion and acne treatment to cancer relief; cosmetics for hair, skin, and nails; the culinary arts, as a food, a spice, and sometimes as garnish; aromatherapy; insect repelling; and many others.
The best and most popular mint oils used in cosmetics are probably peppermint, spearmint, eucalyptus, mint, and wild mint.

Jojoba Oil

Jojoba Oil

I got to know this plant as a teenager, using hair gel with jojoba extract in it. Those days are long gone (and thank heavens for that, because what was I thinking?!), but jojoba hair gel is still used by countless individuals, all over the world. But I digress… the jojoba’s oil is great for all skin types, and is notably effective in aiding the treatment of eczema and psoriasis. The oil itself is the byproduct of the jojoba’s seeds, and its antibacterial properties caused it to find its way into many cosmetics products. Jojoba is a favorite of those who practice aromatherapy, because it has a relatively long shelf life, and is quickly absorbed through the skin.

Apricot Oil

Apricot Oil

Apricot oil is known as an oil which the skin positively loves. Mostly, anyway. There are always exceptions. It is used to heat up areas of the body, to release blockage inside (such as the respiratory and digestive systems). Apricot oil contains healthy amounts of vitamins A, B, C, and E. It also possesses antioxidants and Omega-6 fatty acids. This one, too, have a longer shelf life than your ordinary essential oil, and it, too, is absorbed quickly. Apricot oil is always said to be the best substitute for almond oil, because of the similarities between the two. Perfect for those with nut allergies, who still want to experience the benefits of this strong, deep, and nutty oil.

Conclusion

Obviously, this is a partial list, terribly incomplete. These are only 10 out of nearly 100 different essential oils. As I said, oils are a staple. Used correctly, and infused properly into a high-quality formula, they can induce positive change, and turn almost any cosmetic product into a winner.

If you are looking to make your own brand, and are in the market for a private label, do yourself a huge favor and choose to work only with companies which guarantee the highest quality of oils. They are indeed essential, and using the purest and most beneficial strains and varieties can potentially be the factor which stands between making a profit and taking a hit.

Thanks for reading our oils feature! For more information on private labeling, like info on private label vs. arbitrage and private label brand examples, check out the rest of our blog here at Innovative Private Label!

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